cfp: wise fools

All you devoted Paradoxes readers might be keen to learn that I just put out a new CFP over at Unsettling Wonder. The theme for the issue is ‘Wise Fools’.

Here’s it is for your perusal and general distribution:
CFP1-2 And here’s a tale of a wise fool, to explain more thoroughly than I could what this issue is about.

One night the Hodja looked into his well and saw there the reflection of the full moon.

“Oh no!” he exclaimed. “The moon has fallen from the sky and into my well!”

He ran into his house and returned with a hook attached to a rope. He then threw the hook into the water and commenced to pull it up again, but it became stuck on the side of the well. Frantically the Hodja tugged and pulled with all his might. The hook suddenly came loose, and the Hodja fell over backwards, landing flat on his back. Scarcely able to move, he looked up into the sky and saw the full moon above him.

“I may have injured myself in doing so,” he said with satisfaction, “but at least I got the moon back into the sky where it belongs.”

unsettling wonder

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, and any mutated hamsters that happen to be reading:

As promised, Unsettling Wonder has come back.

Remember how I was doing a read-through of the Grimm’s Kinder- und Hausmarchen? Well, the new iteration of Unsettling Wonder is almost completely not at all like that. Except that I got the idea while I was doing the Grimm read through. There were all these strange and funny little tales that no one ever talks about, all these weird little folktale variants.

So I wanted to make a place where the more offbeat, less exploited tales could be re-discovered. And, as other friends and editors came on board, including my long-time blogalectic sparring partner, Jenna St. Hilaire, I thought—making this could be a lot of fun.

The new Unsettling Wonder is a publishing imprint of Papaveria Press that includes both an online journal and various print publications. It lives at www.unsettlingwonder.com, and the website will have not only the journal, but regular posts from the editors and guest writers about folklore and fairy tales—including artist and author interviews, book reviews, and so on.

As the marvellous Katherine Langrish, UW’s folktale editor I’m happy to say, wrote at her blog:

Unsettling Wonder has only just been born, and in the way of fairytale parents we, its founders, are still looking it proudly, scratching our heads and wondering what it will make of life. Has it been born in a caul, or under a lucky star? Will its godmother be the Fairy of Good Fortune, or the sinister black-cowled figure of La Muerte?  Is it even a child, or just a bristly half-hedgehog? Anyway, do come to the christening!

And Unsettling Wonder is accepting submissions. Our first issue is themed on Wonder Voyages; you can find the formal call for papers here.

[Image by Laura Anderson]

CFP: George MacDonald conference

Among the other crazy things I do, I’m also doing the following, aiding the redoubtable efforts of my lovely colleague Ginger Stelle. You heard it first on Paradoxes.

Call for Papers:

George MacDonald among His Contemporaries

A one day conference hosted by the School of English, University of St Andrews

30 March 2011

Kennedy Hall, St Andrews, Scotland

George MacDonald (1824-1905) is most often discussed in terms of what came after: his role in the development of fantasy literature and his influence on writers such as C. S. Lewis and
J. R. R. Tolkien. Though providing valuable insights into MacDonald’s legacy, this emphasis tends to obscure his involvement in his own time. MacDonald was a Victorian. His works attest to his wide knowledge of his time and culture, and his deep engagement with the issues of the day.

Continue reading